Coaching, a strategy for goals and personal growth.

Why work with a coach?

Coaching is an area of our business that is really growing. It’s something that I personally do more and more and really enjoy. With careers become more fluid and individuals running portfolios, aspiring to self employment or considering radical changes, the timing has never been better to work with a coach.

In the sports world an athlete doesn’t get to the top of their profession without the guidance and support of a coach. Without a coach they would not be at the peak of their performance, achieve the goals they set themselves and gain the success they so badly want.

Whatever your ambitions, be they running your own business, wanting to progress in your career or achieve a happy work-life balance we know that:

  • If you commit your goals to writing you are 40% more likely to achieve them.
  • If you tell someone else you are 60% more likely to achieve them.
  • If you have a coach you are 95% more likely to achieve your goals.

Coaching can come in many forms – but a coach is someone who will enable you to improve, motivate you and hold you accountable to set and achieve your goals, enabling your personal growth. When we ask people about personal growth it is often something they abandoned long ago as other responsibilities crept into their lives. It doesn’t have to be like that.

Some of the positive benefits of working with a coach are:

  • Time to focus on YOU and what you want to achieve.
  • Achieve greater results in less time.
  • Someone to challenge, motivate and support you.
  • Enable you to come up with a fresh approach to an old problem.
  • A safe supportive environment to discuss your issues and test out your ideas.
  • Your personal development mentor.
  • Give you accountability and commitment.
  • Create an action plan and support you in achieving it.
  • Someone to provide unconditional support and praise or give constructive feedback.

Coaches provide:

  • Regular focus, motivation and make you clearly accountable
  • An objective impartial point of view.  Unlike your friends, partner, family, work colleagues or boss.
  • A different perspective – allowing you to step back and take a fresh look at things.
  • A safe environment in which to talk through your challenges and issues.
  • Questions that will uncover the source of any problem or blockage.
  • Identify what is really important for you.
  • Challenge – to stretch you and nudge you out your comfort zone.
  • A sounding board for your ideas.

Amelore Raffle Prize update!

Here are some of our awesome raffle prizes that you can have a chance to win come the big draw on Tuesday 3 November 2015 during an evening with Sophie Cornish and Ruth Cornish at the Pittville Pump Room, Cheltenham. In aid of Maggie’s Centres, it promises to be a fascinating evening especially if you want to grow your business or have the kernel of an idea and wish to build a business around it… To get your raffle tickets contact the office and for The Event tickets are available through Eventbrite: http://bit.ly/1Me1Cv9

Enter the raffle for your chance to win…

Roksanda Dress

The lucky winner who chooses this prize wins a dress by this amazing Designer. Click through the link below to see some of the wonderful dresses from Roksanda to get excited about.

http://www.matchesfashion.com/womens/designers/roksanda

Monica Vinader Earrings

Win a stunningDSC_3134 pair of Riva diamond and amethyst cocktail earrings from Monica Vinader… A perfect accessory for your Christmas cocktail outfit for years to come.

 

 

 

 

Penny Vincenzi – signed book ‘A Perfect Heritage’ and afternoon tea.

Only afternoon tea and a signed copy of Penny’s latest book ‘A Perfect Heritage’. Here Penny talks about ‘A Perfect Heritage’ in this short film.

L’Occitane Hamper

DSC_3091Packed with all sorts of goodies including Almond Oil Shower Gel, Lavender foam bath, soaps, hand creams and lotions. Win this and luxuriate in these renowned toiletries from Provence.

 

A bottle of Rothschild Blanc de Blanc Champagne

DSC_3136A very nice bottle donated by Sian Westerman. Reviews say the colour is pale yellow. Orange zest, lemongrass, jasmine and chalky minerals on the perfumed nose, with a hint of white pepper adding lift. Juicy, mineral-accented citrus and orchard fruit flavors are fleshed out by suggestions of melon and honey, putting on weight with air while maintaining vivacity. Spicy and focused on the very long, mineral-driven finish, which leaves chalky mineral and floral notes behind. – Josh Reynolds. Good to drink until 2020 or take it home and celebrate on the night!!

A slice of cake a month from The Cake Nest.

cake nest

Shortlisted for the notonthehighstreet.com Make Awards, The Cake Nest will post a delicious slice of cake (they are designed to fit through your letterbox!) every month for a year. Click on the link below to see what it’s all about.

http://www.cakenest.co.uk/shop/cake-slice-club/monthly-cake-club

The evening will also include an auction of a business review with star of the night Sophie Cornish and lunch with City businesswoman Nicola Horlick.

Good luck to all who enter and look forward to seeing you on the night!

Retaining your flexible / seasonal workforce… things to consider

snoopy-charlie-brown-end-of-summerIt is the end of the season now for ‘Happy Holidays’ and most of us are on our way back home for the winter.  Some of us are already thinking about next year though.  You may remember that one of my first postings was about leaving a role from an employee’s point of view.  To bring things full circle, I was considering some pointers for organisations like ‘Happy Holidays’ who are keen to retain their flexible workforce even though there is a break of a few months before work starts again.

Flexible working is becoming more widespread and can be beneficial for both organisations and individuals; after all not everyone wants to work full time, all of the time.  If you have some talented / skilled staff and want to retain them even when work isn’t available what can you do?  Some suggestions could include the following:

  • Does the person know that you would like them to work for you again in the future?  Be explicit about this and make sure that they know that you value their skills and expertise.  Be clear that you would like to offer them work again when it is available.
  • Have an honest, open conversation about the gap in the work and how it affects for you both.  Are you both ok with the gap?  Does the person want to work for you again when the work resumes? (Be clear about both or your expectations.)
  • Are there any other work options coming up?  They may not be the same but they could have tranferrable skills you could use.
  • Assuming the answer is yes, agree how you will keep in touch during the gap.  Keeping in touch means they still feel part of things and will increase the prospects of them returning to you later.  It could be as simple as email newsletters, other corporate updates or even a Christmas card.
  • Do you want them to do any training / skills updating / CPD (continuous professional development) during the gap?  Is this obligatory or just preferable?  (if it’s obligatory are you going to pay them to do it?)
  • Do you want to offer any retainer payments or welcome back payments as an incentive for their return?  Or are there any other benefits you could offer as an incentive to them to return?
  • If they can’t return to work for you, can they recommend you to other colleagues with similar skills and experience who you might want to offer work to?  (this could be another incentive such as a ‘recommend a friend’ scheme.)

Motivated, talented staff are worth a lot – so even if your initial reaction to some of the points above is ‘no’, you might want to really weigh up the costs and advantages again and decide if you really can afford not to do some of these things after all.

So until next season……..  A bientot.

Sports Direct – not the place for the unfit

ambulance_1817580bIf I was the CEO of Sport’s Direct, I would be arranging a swift overview of HR practices after the undesirable press today following a BBC investigation.

A Freedom of Information request has revealed that the East Midlands ambulance service were called to the head office more than 76 times in two years, for some workers with what was described as ‘life threatening conditions’.

It is apparent that Sports Direct have relationships with recruitment agencies that operate a 6 strike policy for temporary staff. According to this policy, workers can receive a strike for a range of “offences” including:

  • Periods of reported sickness
  • Excessive chatting
  • Excessive or long toilet breaks
  • Using a mobile phone in the warehouse

A document produced by one of the agencies stated that they can end an assignment “at any time without reason, notice or liability”. The article reports that “Former workers said some staff were “too scared” to take sick leave because they feared losing their jobs.”

Unite commented in the BBC article today that it had been told that last year there were about 3,000 agency workers at the Shirebrook headquarters of Sports Direct on zero-hour contracts.

A further 75% of staff across its UK stores are also on zero-hour contracts, with Sports Direct accounting for a fifth of all such contracts in the retail sector, according to Unite.

Sports Direct has also reported accidents in its warehouse have doubled in the past financial year.

Amelore comment

Whilst managing sickness absence is key for any employer it is important that any incentive practices don’t encourage workers to attend work if feeling unwell. This can result in the serious situations that have required ambulance attention that could perhaps have been avoided – ambulances that could be needed elsewhere threatening the health of others.

One should always take care that any practices comply with the Equality Act and that organisations are certain that the reason for absence is not linked to a disability.

We are aware of a primary school Head teacher who has implemented a policy of non-uniform day once a month for all children that have had 100% attendance. The ones that have had even 1 day off, are publically identified because they have to by wear full school uniform.

Naming and shaming young children who don’t decide for themselves whether they are well enough to attend is an extremely poor practice.

Sports Direct’s HR Director, CEO and H&S lead would do well to listen to their workers and union representatives and make some changes to their working practices to ensure any preventive accidents or health problems are prevented NOW.

 

Flu have got to be serious!

It’s that time of year when GP surgeries and private health organisations are promoting flu jabs. We often get asked about the benefit of flu jabs and what impact, if any, does the injection have on sickness absence in the workplace.

Flu marketing

Why bother?

Minor illnesses (such as flu) accounted for 27.4 million lost working days in the UK economy in 2013. This is 30% of all sickness absences in the same year, which is by far the most common reason given. A survey carried out by the Co-operative Group in 2010 found that a total of 7.6 million working days are lost each year in the UK specifically because of flu, costing the British economy £1.35bn.

It is usual for an individual with flu to take up to 5 days absence from work and it is estimated that sickness absence causes by flu costs an employer £522 per employee.

A review of 55 case studies found that there were immediate and financial benefits from wellbeing interventions found in a number of cases across all sectors and business sizes (Price Waterhouse Coopers, 2008).

One example of this was an NHS organisation, where a voluntary flu immunisation programme for staff led to two fewer working days absence among those who were immunised. In monetary terms, over two years the benefit of this programme was 9.2 times the cost: good health was found to be good business for employers.

Vaccination really can work. A workforce can reduce lost work days by up to 45% during an outbreak of flu.

NHS Hospital staff in South Tyneside are preparing for the impending winter by getting their flu jabs.  The Trust has trained ‘flu champions’ to help its occupational health department deliver the campaign at South Tyneside District Hospital and at community health venues in Gateshead, South Tyneside and Sunderland.

Dr Bob Brown, executive director of nursing and patient safety, said: “The flu vaccine is the best protection we have against an unpredictable virus which can cause severe illness and deaths among at-risk groups, including older people, pregnant women and those with a health condition – even one that is well-managed.

More about Flu vaccinations

Flu vaccination by injection, commonly known as the “flu jab” is available every year on the NHS to protect adults (and some children) at risk of flu and its complications.

Whilst Influenza or Flu can be unpleasant, if you are otherwise healthy it will usually clear up on its own within a week. However, flu can be more severe in certain people, such as:

  • anyone aged 65 and over
  • pregnant women
  • children and adults with an underlying health condition (particularly long-term heart or respiratory disease)
  • children and adults with weakened immune systems such as those without a spleen etc

Anyone in these risk groups is more likely to develop potentially serious complications of flu, such as pneumonia (a lung infection), so it’s recommended that they have a flu vaccine every year to protect them.

The flu vaccine is given free on the NHS as an annual injection to:

  • adults over the age of 18 at risk of flu (including everyone aged 65 and over)
  • children aged six months to two years at risk of flu

But does it work?

Last winter it emerged that the seasonal flu vaccine used offered barely any cover against the main strain of flu encountered in the UK. Mutations in the HA molecule on one of the most common circulating strains, H3N2, meant that the seasonal flu vaccine offered little protection. Public Health England said in February that the less effective vaccine was likely to have been behind a steep rise in flu deaths.

Ministers are urging people not to be put off by failures of the flu vaccine last year. They say those who qualify for a free jab, or spray for children, should take up the offer this winter as it still offers the most effective cover against flu.

Dr Hugh van’t Hoff, GP, Stonehouse, Gloucestershire and Lead for Facts4life commented “Vaccination is one of the triumphs of modern medicine. It has a very good safety record and provides a way of alerting the immune system about dangerous illnesses.”

What is the future?

A universal flu vaccine that protects against multiple strains of the virus is a step closer after scientists created experimental jabs that work in animals.

The vaccines prevented deaths or reduced symptoms in mice, ferrets and monkeys infected with different types of flu, raising hopes for a reliable alternative to the seasonal vaccine.

Doctors hope that a universal flu vaccine would do away with the need for people at risk to have flu jabs every year, and even protect the public from dangerous, potentially pandemic, strains that jump from birds or pigs into humans.

Conventional flu vaccines target the “head” of a molecule called haemagglutinin (HA) that sits on the surface of flu viruses. But because the head of the HA mutates so rapidly, seasonal flu vaccines must be continually re-formulated to ensure they are effective.

Health and Wellbeing strategies

Many employers recognize the benefit of proactive wellbeing strategies. Even if they are not arranging for an in-house vaccination program they are reimbursing employees who get this done privately. Moneysavingexpert has an up to date .