5 things every manager (of people) should know

Being a manager can be both a tough and a highly rewarding job. Often the result of a promotion coming after hard work. Or a brand new role in a new organisation.  But rarely does the status of manager come with a tight brief and any training. Most managers learn the hard way about what is expected of them and for many their main source of development is how they have been managed; well or badly.

If every manager understood the following 5 things clearly their chances of being successful and effective would significantly improve which in turn would have a powerful knock on effect across the company.

What their purpose is

When we audit companies we often ask the CEO and other senior people, what the purpose of different roles are. We also ask the individual doing that role. Often the definitions don’t match. Sometimes it sounds like two different jobs to us. If you do nothing else, make sure you can articulate the purpose of the manager’s role.

Often explanations talk about production, technical expertise, sales targets, quality but rarely do they talk about responsibilities for the people being managed. It can be seen as Business as Usual – ie in addition to other expectations on the manager meaning it will be a low priority. Which will impact on the whole culture of the organisation and not in a positive way.

What they can and can’t do

This might seem obvious but it rarely is.  We are talking about whether they can hire and fire, what their budget is, whether they can arrange training and promote people. Are they free to discipline their staff or must this be culturally approved? What isn’t written on the job description or needs to be explained?

What vicarious liability is and how it might impact on them

Vicarious liability refers to a situation where someone is held responsible for the actions or omissions of another person. In a workplace context, an employer can be liable for the acts or omissions of its employees, provided it can be shown that they took place in the course of their employment.

Many employers are unaware that they can be liable for a range of actions committed by their employees in the course of their employment – these can include bullying and harassment, violent or discriminatory acts or even libel and breach of copyright. It’s also possible to take action against an employer for the behaviour of third parties, such as clients and customers, provided these parties are deemed to be under the control of the employer.

The key question of any case of vicarious liability is whether the employee was acting in a personal capacity, or in the course of their employment. This can often be difficult to determine. Nor does an employer’s liability end once the employee leaves the organisation – as the law stands, action can still be taken against an employer even though the person in question no longer works for them.

What their H&S responsibilities are

Under the law employers are responsible for health and safety management. For every employee this responsibility lies with their manager. Even if there is a H&S Advisor. It is the managers that have the responsibility on a day to day basis because it is the employer’s duty to protect the health, safety and welfare of their employees and other people who might be affected by their business.

This means making sure that workers and others are protected from anything that may cause harm, effectively controlling any risks to injury or health that could arise in the workplace which includes managing and monitoring stress. Also managing sickness absence and understanding when an employee may need to be offered reasonable adjustments if they have a special need or a disability, and it might help them remain at work.

Employers also have duties under health and safety law to assess risks in the workplace. Risk assessments should be carried out that address all risks that might cause harm in your workplace.

What the unwritten rules are

Often the unwritten rules or internal ways of working are the biggest keys to success or failure. Knowing them is a start. Often politics is a key part of this. Who to know, be connected with. Who to avoid upsetting. How the organisation deals with conflict and disagreements. How the culture dictates the ways of working for the organisation.

We get involved in situations where managers haven’t worked out and often failing to understand and comply with unwritten rules (obvious to everyone apart from the manager) is sited. Imagine being told it was all over for failing to comply with rules that no-one told them about.

Often a solution to tackling any of these issues that you recognise can be signing up to an HR audit and a bespoke management training programme. So that you know your managers are being supported but also that what they are being taught and guided on is appropriate and on brand for your company.  This can be in conjunction with senior leaders and any internal HR function.

The good news is Amelore offer this service so do get in touch if we can help and advise you further.

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