Is in-house HR the best option for your Company?

Having worked ‘in-house’ for much of my career and more recently as a consultant, I’ve had seen both sides. This is particularly illuminated when one performs a detailed ‘access all areas’ HR audit.  Matching the needs of the business against the capability and remit of the HR function. Often it can be a bigger gap than anyone realises.

New role in HR – Work out what you need to do to fit in

When you begin a new role with a Company they are keen that you bring new ideas and change things. But many quickly realise that the most important thing to learn is ‘How they do things around here’. For in many companies not working that out quickly could mean one is not in post long enough to do more than just be new.

Companies by their very nature are insular. The individuals that do well are either the very brave and talented who do their own thing but bring in so much revenue that no-one cares. Equally those that are extremely corporate will have long and successful careers. Individuals that are very bright will move on naturally because there will be many options for them. Those that are clearly poorly performing will be moved on. But everyone else stays.

So, in that context the parameters of what ‘good HR’ looks like are set. This will almost certainly involve maintaining unique processes and ways of doing things. Quirky administrative approaches. Often long winded. And all the unwritten stuff about who gets fired quickly and how.  And what gets ignored or isn’t deemed officially important.

HR ignore half their customers

When a Company initiates an HR audit what they often want to know is how do we compare with our competitors? Do we have the right resources and skills in HR. Too much or too little? That answer is always unique to the organisation as often it is driven by individuals and/or the sector. If you have someone very senior that insists that HR is all about administration and problem solving and nothing more than that will dictate who you have in your function. If you are in a sector where you have high turnover and a lot of ER problems that may require some intense catch up before you move to a different model.

Companies have different motivations for HR audit from are we compliant (will I get my bonus?) right through to do we have the skills and talent in HR and the remit to achieve what the ambitious CEO and board want to achieve.  Often there is quite a gap.

And HR still exclusively focus their activities on ‘employees’. The self-employed, the flexible labour and the workforce of tomorrow are largely ignored which is a bit like only caring about the customers that visit your store and not the ones that shop occasionally on-line or could be buying your products.

Most HR process are substantially similar – not substantially different.

In an article written by Ruud Rikhof, Managing Partner of KennedyFitch he states “We believe that 80% of the activities in HR are substantially similar from company to company, not substantially different”. So, if it is substantially similar, why would you need it “in-house and customised” when you could pass it on to someone else, do it quicker and save money?

So many HR practitioners talk about Best in class. So many CEO’s don’t share these aspirations as they see such a process as long winded, expensive and distracting from core business.

Do ‘best in class’ processes you have contribute to the bottom line?

Whilst core HR processes should be agile and robust, they will never give your business a competitive edge. So, it’s wise to focus what resource you have on the things that will.

One of the issues about benchmarking your company’s HR needs against another is that whatever standard you use may not be the right one.

Your performance management system may have won awards and have some great technology with it – but does it drive performance?

You may have invested in a fantastic HR software system – but where are the reports and does anyone use or understand it apart from HR?

So, do you know what is right and important for your organisation and is that where you are directing your resources?

Individuals want an individual experience

When you go out to market to hire exceptional talent, the person you offer to is unique. You are excited about them joining and may even create a different package to get them on board. The CEO will take an interest in their on-boarding. But at that point the individual approach begins to wane. HR will get anxious that the Company is being inconsistent and will want the new hire to be treated the same as everyone else.

We have observed that increasingly individuals demand that they are treated as individuals. It’s often a deal breaker. Yet in-house HR activities are focussed on treating everyone the same.

What are the alternatives?

Many companies value their long serving loyal HR administrator. Key thing is to ensure you have the right level of senior HR challenge and expertise.

Equally you can contract out the administration, investing in a good system and employ a bright career hungry HR professional to work with your leaders and focus on the big things for your Company.

Many companies have an Employment lawyer on speed dial which absolutely supports the reactive problem solving risk adverse model that is hardly likely to have your HR function doing things differently.

Of course you can have both. HR lead in-house and HR admin in house. But that then results in what many businesses have now. A cost centre that stops more than it starts and manages problems.

Getting your HR capability right can be a powerful tool for increased competitive advantage. Especially in a challenging market

 

www.amelore.com

Fit for business? How about an audit?

People often ask what differences I see between working in the UK and France, particularly as a manager.  If there is one thing that is likely to strike terror in to the heart of a French manager or business owner what do you think it would be? Trade unions? Staff demanding their 2 hour lunch break? The actual answer is an “inspecteur du travail”, who is literally a government “workplace inspector”.  Under French law, people in these roles have the right to inspect any business, big or small, at any time to ensure that the employer is upholding their legal, employment obligations towards their workers and staff.

Surprisingly most French people actually think this role is a good and important thing, rather than being “government interference”.  It helps to ensure staff safety, means that French businesses always have their paperwork in order and apparently contributes to France’s high productivity levels. But it could never happen in the UK could it, especially not after Brexit?!

No – not exactly.  However, if you work in a “regulated industry” or supply services to one, you may actually find your employment practises (including your employee related “paperwork”) come under scrutiny. So what do I mean by a “regulated industry” and could it include you?  The typical kinds of organisations or activities that would put you in this definition would be some of the following examples (though not an exhaustive list by any means):

  • Financial services – particularly product selling and advising.
  • Social care – providing any sort of social care, to people young, vulnerable or old.
  • Health Care.
  • Education – be in for children or adults.
  • Housing providers – private sector, public sector or not-for-profit.
  • Utilities providers – including telecoms, as well as water, power etc.
  • Local government – who may well also provide some of the services outlined above.

When you include organisations and businesses who supply services or goods to the types of organisation listed above, you start to realise what a potentially large number this is.

The people who do the scrutinising or inspecting are likely to come from a regulatory body such Ofsted, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) or OFWAT, but there are times when other individuals may need or demand to scrutinise your business.  For example, should you be unfortunate enough to have a serious workplace accident, then the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) will come in and investigate.  This will include scrutinising your policies, training records, employee files and more. It can be incredibly scary, especially as you won’t have had time to “get your house in order” beforehand so any gaps in your “paper trail”, that you have been meaning to fill in, won’t have been sorted out. Oops.

As you are probably aware, the penalties that the HSE or other inspection bodies can levy can be punitive, substantial and costly.  They can even stop you trading / operating.  All potentially because you haven’t been able to produce a particular bit of information or paperwork, or because you haven’t got a policy or process in place.

Sometimes businesses also voluntarily invite people to come and inspect them too. If your business wishes to gain accreditation from Investors in People or to gain an ISO standard then their assessors will need to scrutinise and check that you say you are doing exactly what you claim and what their standards require.  Again, this will be a detailed look at your processes, procedures, policies and employee files.  If you don’t have the things in place that the standard requires, then no accreditation – and potentially a long wait (and associated cost) until you can attempt to get accredited again.  It may even mean that you can’t tender / provide your services to key customers until you get that accreditation.

So, how confident are you that your current HR policies, processes and employee files would stand up to such close scrutiny – be it on a voluntary or regulatory basis?  If you aren’t sure, then we strongly recommend that you take action now.  Who knows what tomorrow may bring?


What does an HR Audit or HR Operational Review involve?

Bringing in external auditors is not anyones favourite pastime however it is accepted as a normal part of business life.  Important for shareholders and investors to get reassurance that everything is going well and often Directors get well deserved credit for good governance and Internal controls.

However, what a more in depth internal audit can bring is a sensor check of how compliant and fit for purpose your business is.

Depending on your needs, we can just do a paper review and look at key documentation such as employment contracts, employee data and staff handbooks. Or we can also meet key staff and check understanding and needs spotting early problems emerging and flagging them.  We can also assess the fit of key staff in key roles if you would like us to.

We then produce a report with recommendations for you to set and implement your own priorities.  Our work with you may include further reviews to check on progress.

HR Audits give you the heads up on what you could and should be thinking about in your business.


At Amelore we offer a tailored service to help you to get your business in shape and to make sure you are ready for whatever tomorrow may throw at you.  Why not contact us to find out more about our HR audit service or our HR bootcamp?

www.amelore.com