What every manager wants to avoid

In our work, we audit any new company we work with and have observed that a common theme in many is that managers don’t appear to want to manage.

By that we mean managing people. Setting standards on performance and monitoring them, holding employees to account, identifying what behaviours are needed to create the right culture to grow the business and being confrontational if and when it is necessary. Or they are only embracing the nicer side of management. Giving out pay rises and promotions etc

Managers and leaders seldom avoid this type of work for any other reason than they don’t know how to do it and are worried about getting it wrong. Often employees pick up on a fear and become experts on how to make the most of this which is rarely beneficial for the manager or the company. Equally managers aren’t set any targets or held to account about whether they do it (well) or not. So they will naturally focus on what is valued.

As we are all aware, being good at a technical or specialist role can often lead to promotion into a completely different type of role. Leading and managing a team is so much more than being the most senior member of it with the biggest say. The person that earns the most does so because they also have significant people management responsibilities and are accountable for their team as well as business area. Rarely is this properly explained. During recruitment or promotion discussions. Usually the elephant in the room and therefore often misunderstood.

No training or guidance for managers

Here are some of the things that managers have often had no training or guidance on whatsoever:

  • A core understanding of management theory and what is relevant to their company and industry
  • How to delegate and communicate effectively
  • An understanding of their obligations and duty of care under employment and health and safety legislation
  • How to turn key organisational KPI’s into objectives or targets for staff
  • The difference between technical and behavioural competence
  • How to understand and harness the power of personality
  • How to select staff – interview competentantly, understand and recognise unconscious bias and discrimination. Understand the equality act.
  • Motivational techniques and team building

It stands to reason that if you don’t know how to do something you may avoid it or try and get someone else to do it. Particularly if you fear negative consequences for yourself. Or if you observe that no-one else is tackling similar issues.

Revolving door culture

But as many will be aware, not doing something often has a bigger impact on your culture than doing something, even if it’s not perfect. Not tackling people management issues will build up over time until you start to observe that your good people are leaving. You will replace them of course. At considerable time and expense. And then your fanastic new hire might leave before their probabtion period is up and you start to wonder if it’s something in the business.

The truth is that it’s your culture. How you do things. What you avoid or ignore.

Targetted development

But you can address the fear and reluctance of maangers with some targeted management development training. A core part of that should be an assessment of whether you have the right poepe in lead roles.  Often you will have and they just need devellping. But some people don’t make or want to manage people. No matter how much you spend on core Leadership programmes. However they may be suited to a different specialist role? Or have a No 2 that is interested?

What provider to pick?

There are plenty of companies around who specialise in leadership and management development training. Many long established and many newer ones coming through.

Talking to CEO’s about their previous experiences of such engagement they often report that many staff enjoy attending such initiaitves but they rarely had a long lasting effect as they often didn’t address the following issues:

  • Who held managerial posts
  • What their remit was v what they did
  • Whether the corporate structure was correct
  • What the culture was (desirable v actual)
  • How they would be managed post the intervention

It was hard therefore to quantify any return on the investment made often because the desired outcome hadn’t been pinned down or properly understood.

Our approach

At Amelore, supporting organisations to develop managers has become a growing area for us.  We usually work with companies that are already established and performing well but who want to develop their management team and culture to create space for a senior team to focus on the strategy. Often they don’t have an HR Director in their business.

Our work as external HR professionals can involve us recruiting new managers and coaching key individuals along side regular internal workshops. We can honestly say that every company has different needs and consequently different programmes.

What we bring is our insight into how to make companies work better which we’ve gained over many years. And our HR expertise.  And just like Mary Poppins, we stay as long as we are needed. Ultimately our aim is to leave that company in a good place to grow, compete and innovate. To give it competitive advantage because it works as well on the inside as the outside.

GDPR – Employee record keeping and beyond

In a series of blogs, Amelore begin to look at GDPR from a HR perspective to ensure employers are ready for the new requirements in respect of their employee data and beyond. This will form part of a continuous focus on this hot topic until May 2018 when GDPR goes live. We appreciate many companies may not yet of begun their GDPR journeys, so we will be offering advice and guidance in short blogs.  We will also help to signpost employers to useful information which extends beyond the processing of employee data.

GDPR is itself an extension of existing UK data protection laws. This new legislation builds on the Data Protection Act (DPA) which employers already need to adhere to. DPA principles cover areas such as ensuring employers keep accurate, secure information.

The ICO (Information Commission’s Office) are at the forefront of helping organisations understand this evolution of our data protection laws. They recently published GDPR Myths. This series of blogs helps to demystify the new regulations.

Data breach – what an employer needs to do?

In ICO’s latest blog they provide valuable advice and guidance on how employers need to respond if a data breach occurs. They report that some employers have expressed concern that any data breach needs to be reported and that huge fines will ensue. The ICO say this is not the case and that only breaches that are likely to risk people’s rights and freedoms will need to be reported.

The ICO also point out that fines will be proportionate and that companies who are open, honest and report without undue delay can avoid fines. It is expected that by now, larger organisations will already have appointed a Data Protection Officer (DPO). However, smaller organisations are also advised to consider who in their organisation is responsible for data. We would advise all organisations, no matter how small, to know who is responsible for data (again not just employee data) and who is responsible for reporting a breach should it occur. This starts to form a robust approach to data governance.

Employee data processing

Employee data processing will be a key focus for many organisations, however some employers may be worried about any potential changes to how they currently store their data.

All organisations will be storing employee records in some way, shape or form; so you are now advised to review these filing systems, including the security of the data you are processing in respect of employing people, to ensure robustness. We have already observed some organisations writing to their third-party data processers asking for evidence of their compliance.

Handlers of this data need to make sure they are processing data fairly and for legitimate purposes. Furthermore, if they are transferring it outside of the EEA there are specific safeguards in place.

For those employers wondering if the UK’s exit from the EU will affect GDPR the government has already confirmed it will not. However, please note that International companies operating across EU states will need to work out who their lead data protection supervisory board is.

Further still, forming a data protection working party or project team to audit what data is being processed is also advisable. Many companies are already helping organisations with data mapping and auditing. Amelore work closely with Mazars to provide a range of services for our clients.

In summary, the good news is that common sense does prevail and that the processing of data where it is necessary for the performance of a contract will be a valid reason for processing. If you have any queries or questions in relation to any of the points made please contact Amelore for further advice and guidance.

We will continue to focus on this topic as we approach next year tackling other aspects of the GDPR (link to first blog) in further detail; such as consent, the right to be forgotten, and subject access requests.

 

Is in-house HR the best option for your Company?

Having worked ‘in-house’ for much of my career and more recently as a consultant, I’ve had seen both sides. This is particularly illuminated when one performs a detailed ‘access all areas’ HR audit.  Matching the needs of the business against the capability and remit of the HR function. Often it can be a bigger gap than anyone realises.

New role in HR – Work out what you need to do to fit in

When you begin a new role with a Company they are keen that you bring new ideas and change things. But many quickly realise that the most important thing to learn is ‘How they do things around here’. For in many companies not working that out quickly could mean one is not in post long enough to do more than just be new.

Companies by their very nature are insular. The individuals that do well are either the very brave and talented who do their own thing but bring in so much revenue that no-one cares. Equally those that are extremely corporate will have long and successful careers. Individuals that are very bright will move on naturally because there will be many options for them. Those that are clearly poorly performing will be moved on. But everyone else stays.

So, in that context the parameters of what ‘good HR’ looks like are set. This will almost certainly involve maintaining unique processes and ways of doing things. Quirky administrative approaches. Often long winded. And all the unwritten stuff about who gets fired quickly and how.  And what gets ignored or isn’t deemed officially important.

HR ignore half their customers

When a Company initiates an HR audit what they often want to know is how do we compare with our competitors? Do we have the right resources and skills in HR. Too much or too little? That answer is always unique to the organisation as often it is driven by individuals and/or the sector. If you have someone very senior that insists that HR is all about administration and problem solving and nothing more than that will dictate who you have in your function. If you are in a sector where you have high turnover and a lot of ER problems that may require some intense catch up before you move to a different model.

Companies have different motivations for HR audit from are we compliant (will I get my bonus?) right through to do we have the skills and talent in HR and the remit to achieve what the ambitious CEO and board want to achieve.  Often there is quite a gap.

And HR still exclusively focus their activities on ‘employees’. The self-employed, the flexible labour and the workforce of tomorrow are largely ignored which is a bit like only caring about the customers that visit your store and not the ones that shop occasionally on-line or could be buying your products.

Most HR process are substantially similar – not substantially different.

In an article written by Ruud Rikhof, Managing Partner of KennedyFitch he states “We believe that 80% of the activities in HR are substantially similar from company to company, not substantially different”. So, if it is substantially similar, why would you need it “in-house and customised” when you could pass it on to someone else, do it quicker and save money?

So many HR practitioners talk about Best in class. So many CEO’s don’t share these aspirations as they see such a process as long winded, expensive and distracting from core business.

Do ‘best in class’ processes you have contribute to the bottom line?

Whilst core HR processes should be agile and robust, they will never give your business a competitive edge. So, it’s wise to focus what resource you have on the things that will.

One of the issues about benchmarking your company’s HR needs against another is that whatever standard you use may not be the right one.

Your performance management system may have won awards and have some great technology with it – but does it drive performance?

You may have invested in a fantastic HR software system – but where are the reports and does anyone use or understand it apart from HR?

So, do you know what is right and important for your organisation and is that where you are directing your resources?

Individuals want an individual experience

When you go out to market to hire exceptional talent, the person you offer to is unique. You are excited about them joining and may even create a different package to get them on board. The CEO will take an interest in their on-boarding. But at that point the individual approach begins to wane. HR will get anxious that the Company is being inconsistent and will want the new hire to be treated the same as everyone else.

We have observed that increasingly individuals demand that they are treated as individuals. It’s often a deal breaker. Yet in-house HR activities are focussed on treating everyone the same.

What are the alternatives?

Many companies value their long serving loyal HR administrator. Key thing is to ensure you have the right level of senior HR challenge and expertise.

Equally you can contract out the administration, investing in a good system and employ a bright career hungry HR professional to work with your leaders and focus on the big things for your Company.

Many companies have an Employment lawyer on speed dial which absolutely supports the reactive problem solving risk adverse model that is hardly likely to have your HR function doing things differently.

Of course you can have both. HR lead in-house and HR admin in house. But that then results in what many businesses have now. A cost centre that stops more than it starts and manages problems.

Getting your HR capability right can be a powerful tool for increased competitive advantage. Especially in a challenging market

 

www.amelore.com

Fit for business? How about an audit?

People often ask what differences I see between working in the UK and France, particularly as a manager.  If there is one thing that is likely to strike terror in to the heart of a French manager or business owner what do you think it would be? Trade unions? Staff demanding their 2 hour lunch break? The actual answer is an “inspecteur du travail”, who is literally a government “workplace inspector”.  Under French law, people in these roles have the right to inspect any business, big or small, at any time to ensure that the employer is upholding their legal, employment obligations towards their workers and staff.

Surprisingly most French people actually think this role is a good and important thing, rather than being “government interference”.  It helps to ensure staff safety, means that French businesses always have their paperwork in order and apparently contributes to France’s high productivity levels. But it could never happen in the UK could it, especially not after Brexit?!

No – not exactly.  However, if you work in a “regulated industry” or supply services to one, you may actually find your employment practises (including your employee related “paperwork”) come under scrutiny. So what do I mean by a “regulated industry” and could it include you?  The typical kinds of organisations or activities that would put you in this definition would be some of the following examples (though not an exhaustive list by any means):

  • Financial services – particularly product selling and advising.
  • Social care – providing any sort of social care, to people young, vulnerable or old.
  • Health Care.
  • Education – be in for children or adults.
  • Housing providers – private sector, public sector or not-for-profit.
  • Utilities providers – including telecoms, as well as water, power etc.
  • Local government – who may well also provide some of the services outlined above.

When you include organisations and businesses who supply services or goods to the types of organisation listed above, you start to realise what a potentially large number this is.

The people who do the scrutinising or inspecting are likely to come from a regulatory body such Ofsted, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) or OFWAT, but there are times when other individuals may need or demand to scrutinise your business.  For example, should you be unfortunate enough to have a serious workplace accident, then the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) will come in and investigate.  This will include scrutinising your policies, training records, employee files and more. It can be incredibly scary, especially as you won’t have had time to “get your house in order” beforehand so any gaps in your “paper trail”, that you have been meaning to fill in, won’t have been sorted out. Oops.

As you are probably aware, the penalties that the HSE or other inspection bodies can levy can be punitive, substantial and costly.  They can even stop you trading / operating.  All potentially because you haven’t been able to produce a particular bit of information or paperwork, or because you haven’t got a policy or process in place.

Sometimes businesses also voluntarily invite people to come and inspect them too. If your business wishes to gain accreditation from Investors in People or to gain an ISO standard then their assessors will need to scrutinise and check that you say you are doing exactly what you claim and what their standards require.  Again, this will be a detailed look at your processes, procedures, policies and employee files.  If you don’t have the things in place that the standard requires, then no accreditation – and potentially a long wait (and associated cost) until you can attempt to get accredited again.  It may even mean that you can’t tender / provide your services to key customers until you get that accreditation.

So, how confident are you that your current HR policies, processes and employee files would stand up to such close scrutiny – be it on a voluntary or regulatory basis?  If you aren’t sure, then we strongly recommend that you take action now.  Who knows what tomorrow may bring?


What does an HR Audit or HR Operational Review involve?

Bringing in external auditors is not anyones favourite pastime however it is accepted as a normal part of business life.  Important for shareholders and investors to get reassurance that everything is going well and often Directors get well deserved credit for good governance and Internal controls.

However, what a more in depth internal audit can bring is a sensor check of how compliant and fit for purpose your business is.

Depending on your needs, we can just do a paper review and look at key documentation such as employment contracts, employee data and staff handbooks. Or we can also meet key staff and check understanding and needs spotting early problems emerging and flagging them.  We can also assess the fit of key staff in key roles if you would like us to.

We then produce a report with recommendations for you to set and implement your own priorities.  Our work with you may include further reviews to check on progress.

HR Audits give you the heads up on what you could and should be thinking about in your business.


At Amelore we offer a tailored service to help you to get your business in shape and to make sure you are ready for whatever tomorrow may throw at you.  Why not contact us to find out more about our HR audit service or our HR bootcamp?

www.amelore.com