Looking to recruit high quality staff but not succeeding?

Despite the looming shadow of Brexit, many UK organisations are still recruiting – albeit on a temporary rather than permanent basis.  Many industry sectors are reporting that it is still difficult to find the right candidates with the right skills and experience, despite the fact that many people are out there searching for new roles right now; myself included.

Is it a matter of the right skills not being out there in the job hunting population or is something else at play?  Here are a couple of examples to illustrate what I mean….

A friend, J, is looking for a new role and career change.  Knowing this he is prepared to take entry level role with the right organisation as long as it gives him what he’s looking for.  J likes being outside, getting up early and working autonomously – he thinks that being a Postman is just the new career for him.  Then he tries to apply for a role with Royal Mail….. To cut a long and painful story short, J’s “candidate experience” is a very negative one.

Why, you may ask?  This should give you a flavour and is not unique to the Royal Mail:

Applications have to be made via an online recruitment portal, which requires you to register, fill in your personal details and to complete an online assessment.  Easier said than done…. J is fairly computer literate and his brother is an “expert” – they try and fail several times to register a basic application.  There is no phone number, email address or help option for him or other applicants to help them with this labyrinthine application process.

If J wasn’t so keen he would give up now. Other suitable applicants may not have the “IT savvy” or the perseverance, so Royal Mail is losing out on a potentially large candidate pool. (how IT savvy do you need to be a Postman anyway?)

  • Where there are multiple vacancies, perhaps with a minor change such as working hours / days or work base, J has to apply separately for each. Each time he applies for a role he has to do the exactly same online assessment again and again.  Frustrating, a waste of his and the Royal Mail’s time (and money?) and it undermines the validity of the assessment. (practise makes perfect – so repeating the test and getting the feedback means you can easily boost your scores).
  • J finally manages to get an application registered and waits to hear. And waits…. And waits. The closing date has been and gone, and despite being told to check his “portal” for progress / an update, there is none.  There is no phone number or email address for him to chase this up so he has to decide whether he waits any longer.  He’s been invited to attend another interview for a different role – so perhaps he’ll just go with that one instead.

I can echo similar experiences to J’s and can add to the what not to do list further:

  • I have a non-standard address and post code – the computer says “no” to allowing me to progress my application. Now what – make one up? (easier said than done)
  • The salary and the exact work location are a mystery. How do I know if the role is paying enough for my needs and am I able / willing to work in that location? (client confidentiality is not an excuse!)  Should I bother to apply?
  • Do I really want to spend hours filling in a very detailed online application form when the majority of this information is on my CV? Can’t I just upload my CV and add in the missing bits?  Also – I can’t save my application part way through – it’s all in one go or nothing.  I don’t have 2 uninterrupted hours available so perhaps I won’t bother….
  • The recruitment portal promises to save my details for next time, should I apply for other roles with the organisation. It doesn’t….  I have to start again if I want to make another application  – do I want to go through that pain again?

So in summary, many of the issues that are putting people off seem to be due to overly automated process with no “human touch”.  Theoretically going for an automated, standardised recruitment portal should make recruitment slicker, cheaper and easier for your organisation – but what about for the candidates?  The initial impression they get from your recruitment system can be extremely negative and it means you have lost them before you even know about them. Employee branding, good PR, your employer reputation and your brand recognition / values aren’t going to change that.

Is it time for a rethink and change to your recruitment approach? We can help……..


Company mergers – creating one big, happy family?


mergeIn my HR “life” back in the UK, I often found myself providing advice on managing change, whether it be restructuring, TUPE transfers or subtler cultural change.  I now find myself on the other side of things, as Happy Holidays and one of their former competitors, Smiley Holidays, have both been acquired by a large French company.  While these purchases took place a while ago now, it is interesting to see how the changes have now started to trickle down to the staff (me!).

So, can these changes create one new, contented holiday company / family?  At the moment, the views of myself and colleagues are mixed – we’re not entirely convinced that things will be better, or even as good.  What could be done to change our minds and to keep us engaged and motivated?  Here are some suggestions:

  • Communicate, communicate, communicate

With any changes or takeovers there are always rumours about what will and won’t happen.  Clear, regular communication is key if you are to stop the rumour mill and keep staff feeling engaged, rather than worried for their jobs.  A monthly newsletter is better than nothing but it doesn’t really do all it needs to.  How about using social media and other forms of communication too?  – Especially if staff are based in multiple locations or work different shift patterns.  Certainly face-to-face updates and briefings tend to be the most popular method with staff themselves, so can this be done in any shape or form? (Skype, Facetime, podcasts etc)

  • It’s not all about structures…..

Most people tend to think of “change” as being about restructuring, but that isn’t always the case.  Yes, it can make sense to join up some teams and to make some efficiencies and savings while doing so, however, this shouldn’t be the knee jerk reaction.  If you are keen to keep current brand identities then you need to keep some differences in place, which means not merging and restructuring everything.  Be clear on what structures will change, why and when, so allowing other, not directly affected teams / departments to stop worrying about what might happen to them. (at least for now)  At least they can focus on their roles properly again and not be distracted or worried about what may lie ahead.

  • Timing is everything

Make sure you understand what the businesses do when and why.  Are there any critical or very busy times when it would be unwise to change things?  For example for Happy Holidays, changing all of the company mobile phones over to a new network provider with new phone numbers perhaps should have been done outside of the holiday season!  There would have been no customers in resort trying to call old numbers or not knowing about new numbers, and would have avoided a number of problems, upsets and complaints.

  • Who are we again?  What do we do?

Staff do identify with the organisation they work for and can often be surprisingly loyal to it.  Staff will feel that they have their “psychological contract” in place with their employer, as well as their actual employment contract.  Any change can potentially challenge the trust between employer and employee, and potentially sever the “psychological contract”.

It’s really important that staff can see and understand what the future holds and what will be changing. They can then choose whether they want to be part of this or not, and act accordingly.  This can include seemingly obvious things such as – are we still planning to deliver the same product(s) or service(s) to the same customer(s)?  Will we keep the same company values (eg. “green” or “ethical” commitments)?  Will I still wear the same uniform?  Will I still work in the same place?  Will I be working the same hours?  Things like this can really make a difference to someone deciding whether they will stay and go through the changes, or leave now to avoid them.

Even though this is about the two holiday companies I hope that the suggestions will be helpful for your business too.  If anyone from Happy Holidays is reading this, you know where I am and I’m more than willing to make this change a positive one!


It’s holiday time – So, how does your holiday policy shape up?

Whilst most employers run the usual January to December holiday year, some companies operate a holiday year which mirrors their financial year. Those very brave employers have a holiday year which follows each employee’s employment start date (administratively this must be a nightmare!)

Employers with an April to March holiday year will find themselves in a peculiar situation for 2016 through to 2018. Remember that all workers are entitled to a minimum of 5.6 weeks’ paid holiday, which means 28 days for a full-timer. Bank holidays count towards this entitlement.

Due to the moving Easter holidays, rather than the typical eight bank holidays in a year, April 2016 – March 2017 will have only six bank holidays, while April 2017 – March 2018 will have ten.

So what can you do about this?

Your first port of call is to check your contractual wording around holiday entitlement. This could throw up a number of different scenarios.

Here are a few (using full-time workers as an example):

  1. When the contract states: “you are entitled to 20 days holiday plus all bank holidays”. For April 2016 – March 2017 this would mean that your employees would only receive 26 days holiday, which is obviously below the statutory minimum entitlement. You would therefore need to give them an additional two days paid holiday. For April 2017 – March 2018 they would receive 30 days holiday, but without specific wording which has anticipated this exact scenario it is unlikely you will be able to deduct the extra two days, as the entitlement is to “all” bank holidays.
  1. When the contract states: “you are entitled to 20 days holiday plus 8 bank holidays”. Again your employees would only receive 26 days holiday for April 2016-March 2017 as there are only six bank holidays. You would therefore need to give your employees an additional two days paid holiday to ensure they receive their statutory minimum entitlement.

However, for April 2017 – March 2018 you could choose not to give employees two of the ten bank holidays (there is no automatic right to time off on a bank holiday). However, unless they agree otherwise, you would not be able to deduct these from the 20 day holiday entitlement as the contract says that they are entitled to 20 days holiday. You would instead have to get them to work two bank holidays, which may not be practical if the office is closed and certainly will not be popular.

  1. When the contract states: “you are entitled to 28 days holiday inclusive of bank holidays”. The result of this is the same as point 2 above. You will have to give two extra days for 2016-2017 and you could choose to require employees to work two bank holidays for 2017-2018.

This situation is bound to arise again in the future so the next time you undertake a review of your employment contracts it would be worth considering whether you want to include wording in the holiday clause so that holiday entitlement can be adjusted each year if necessary to allow for this scenario.

This may be even more desirable where you already offer holiday in excess of the minimum statutory entitlement and don’t want to be in a position of having to afford additional days to employees in a particular year.


Our top 10 tips regarding “Right to Work Checks”

Every employer is aware that it is unlawful to employ someone who does not have the right to carry out the work in question, and employers can be subject to a civil penalty of up to £20,000 per worker for any breach of this.

Avoiding the £20,000 penalty

It is possible to establish a statutory (legal) excuse in respect of such penalties provided that the employer checks the worker’s documents prior to employment commencing, and then repeats the checks for those workers who have time limited permission to work in the UK.

Generally, UK nationals and European Economic Area (EEA) nationals have the automatic right to work in the UK, whereas migrant workers from the rest of the world will need to establish this right to work by showing that they have appropriate permission under one of the tiers of the UK points based system, by way of another form of visa, or under other European Treaty rights.

However, it is important that checks are carried out consistently on all employees and below we detail our top tips on what to do and some potential pitfalls.

  1. Obtain

Obtain an original of one or more documents listed in the Home Office’s Guidance.

The Home Office has produced a helpful right to work checklist which details those documents that can be relied on.

This list is “non negotiable” and no other documents “will do”. You have been warned!!

  1. Check

Check the document in the presence of the holder.

It is surprising the number of employers who arrange for reception staff or managers to take copies of the document but then in fact pass these copies onto the HR function to validate. This is not strictly compliant. Whoever is in the migrant’s presence when the document is presented should be the person doing the check. HR can of course assist, but the ultimate responsibility lies with this individual, so ensure that he or she has had appropriate training.

  1. Make a copy

Take a clear copy of the document(s). If the copy is blurred, illegible or has information missing/cut-off the statutory excuse will not be achieved. This sounds obvious but you’d be surprised.

This copy should then be marked as a true copy of the original, clearly signed and dated, and then stored or scanned and filed securely. Beware Biometric Residence Permits (BRP’s). It is mandatory to copy the front and back if the statutory excuse is to be secured.

  1. Check the documents thoroughly

It is not simply a matter of taking a photocopy. Make sure you check the validity of the documents, for example that the photos are consistent with the actual appearance of the individual and that any stamps/endorsements look genuine.

If you are given a false document, you will only be required to pay a civil penalty if it is reasonably apparent that it is false, and that means it has to be properly checked.

  1. Specifically check the terms of the visa:

Make sure the job you provide does not break any conditions or restrictions on the type of work an individual can do, or the hours they can work (see below). The terms of the visa or work permission should clearly say what these are. Again, a proper considered check is vital to securing a statutory excuse.

  1. Beware students:

It is important to be aware that non EEA migrants who come to study in the UK under Tier 4 of the points based system are generally entitled to work for a maximum of either 10 hours or 20 hours per week term time (dependent on the course and the educational establishment), and for any period during vacations and following the end of the course to the expiry of their visas.

Since May 2014 it has been the employer’s responsibility to check the dates of working against the student’s published term time tables. If a student is found to be working over the permitted hours during term time then they will be working unlawfully and you will not have a statutory excuse. That additional extra hour of work could therefore cost the business £20,000 per student, so do be sure to check.

  1. Beware discrimination claims:

In an attempt to avoid a £20,000 penalty do not then risk a claim of discrimination, which could prove even more costly. Presumptions should not be made about a person’s right to work in the UK based simply on the basis of their background, appearance or accent. As stated, apply the checks consistently to all workers regardless.

  1. Be mindful of ANY staff that have come TUPE

Yes, that four letter word again. Any employer who “inherits” employees under the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations 2006 would be wise to carry out the right to work checks on all transferring employees if it wishes to be certain it has the statutory excuse.

You have a grace period of 60 days to do this and although you may be able to rely on any checks previously carried out by the transferor, there is no guarantee that these will have been done correctly.

  1. Don’t risk it:

£20,000 is the fine for unlawfully employing a worker subject to immigration control, if this is by mistake / oversight / incompetence. If you know the migrant does not have permission to carry out the work in question then the penalty is unlimited and the owners of the business can be sent to prison for up to two years, and this is set to rise to five years.

  1. If you are audited and fail – take urgent advice!

If, for whatever reason, a statutory excuse is not obtained and the employer finds that it has unknowingly employed a worker unlawfully or finds itself the subject of a Home Office audit, or even “raid”, all is not lost. There are still ways in which to seek to avoid or mitigate any civil penalties but in that eventuality it would certainly be sensible to seek urgent professional advice.

If you would like a review of your current employment practices with a particular focus on your starter and leaver processes, contact Amelore for more details.


Brexit – Dommage or Damage?

Like many people, I’m still slightly in shock about the outcome of the EU referendum on 23 June 2016, when the majority of the British public voted for the UK to leave the European Union.  Perhaps because I’m currently and living in working in Europe, it feels a more serious reality than if I was living back in the UK.

Now the dust has settled a bit on the surprising result (yes, even those campaigning and voting for “Leave” were surprised that they had actually won), it is time to start thinking what the actual implications of the UK leaving the EU will actually mean in practise.  Lots has already been written on this, both here in this blog and across the media as a whole, but let me share with you a European perspective.

“Nothing will happen for at least two years…..”

Things are already happening…….

For UK workers currently posted in Europe and paid in sterling, rather than Euros, their actual salary has already decreased by 15% and counting.  If you employ “posted” workers you will need to think how you can help your staff to still feel that they are earning a reasonable, fair salary now that their money is not going as far.  You will also need to be mindful of how the exchange impacts on the minimum wage of the country they are working in and whether you are still legally complying with it.  (for example in France the minimum hourly rate is currently 9.53 Euros, which is now equivalent to around £8.20 per hour rather than around £7.33 pre-Referendum.)

The tourism industry is already feeling the impact, with potential UK holiday makers deciding maybe they won’t holiday in Europe this year after all.  The area I am working in France is already feeling and noticing this dip in potential income and bookings.  For countries like Spain or Greece where tourist numbers are even higher and their economy is also more reliant on tourism income this could be really serious.

Going forward there is also the question of whether UK citizens will be able to work easily in Europe, or whether they will need to apply for work permits.  Again, for the tourist industry and other industries that employ semi-skilled, short term staff on the local minimum wage, will it be worth their while to even employ or post UK workers to Europe anymore?

Things could also happen more quickly than in two years if some EU politicians have their way, so don’t assume that we definitely have two years grace.

Does Europe care that the UK plans to leave the EU?

In a word, “yes”!

The people I have spoken to recently about Brexit, including those working in local government, the hospitality industry and the tourist industry seem to fall in to two camps.  Those who say it is “dommage” – a shame – and those who think it will be really damaging to Europe, its economy and stability.  Even those who fall in to the “it’s a shame” corner think that things will be worse for the UK, and indirectly, for them too.

While it would be nice to think that nothing much will change and that we have time to get used to the idea of being “out” of Europe, I honestly think that the reality will be different.  As the old saying goes “be careful what you wish for…..” – it will be interesting to see whether leaving Europe is a dream come true or a nightmare.  Watch this space…..



Immigration Act 2016 – Illegal working offences

visa stampAfter months of rumbling through the political process the much debated Immigration Bill finally received royal assent on 13 May 2016, becoming the Immigration Act 2016.

Hot on its heels came the enabling regulations which will bring many of the measures into force on 12 July 2016, including those detailed below.

The purpose of the Act, put quite simply, is to make it as hard as possible for illegal migrants to live and work in the United Kingdom.

Immigration Minister James Brokenshire stated  “The message is clear – if you are here illegally, you shouldn’t be entitled to receive the everyday benefits and services available to hard-working UK families and people who have come to this country legitimately to contribute.”

Below are the key changes employers need to be aware of:

Illegal working

The act of illegal working is to become a criminal offence, punishable by fine and/or up to six months imprisonment. Whether those convicted are in fact jailed at taxpayer’s expense prior to deportation will remain to be seen. However, the obvious point is that, as a criminal offence, any “proceeds” (which would include wages/salary) will now come under the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 and so therefore open to confiscation.

Employing an illegal worker

The penal sanction in respect of employing an individual illegally is to rise from the existing two years to five years, together with a continuing unlimited fine. This is further “beefed up” by amendments to the existing offence. Previously the risk of criminal liability arose if the employer knowingly engaged the migrant unlawfully.

The Act now provides that the offence will be committed if the employer “has reasonable cause to believe that the employee is disqualified from employment.” This is a lower threshold than previously, and presumably is to prevent those who routinely exploit illegal workers, from using plausible deniability to escape unlimited civil penalty and possible imprisonment.

However, for the purposes of all of those other employers who dutifully carry out right to work checks and then monitor the position as appropriate, the stakes have been raised significantly.

At what point, for example, does “reasonable cause” arise, whereby a consequential dismissal may be defended on the basis of “illegality” or “some other substantial reason”? Inaction or delay in this regard may result in an unlimited fine and imprisonment, whereas erring on the side of caution and moving immediately to termination of employment may subsequently result in a successful unfair dismissal claim, with the inherent further risk of an ancillary race claim.

Current new starter processes

Many companies still have out of date or insufficiently robust starters procedures which fail to check properly whether an individual has the right to work in the UK.

Next steps

Now, more than ever, it is important to get right to work systems and policies up to date, fit for purpose, and in place, as the consequences for failing to do this are now significantly more severe than they were previously.

See our blog on Right to Work checks for our top tips.


So, what has Europe ever done for us…?

Karen has returned to France for the summer and here is her first blog of the season… Thoughts of how she felt before the referendum. It’s still a hot topic and will be for some time…

It’s a strange time to be back living and working in France, with the EU referendum result.  Up until last week it was always a given that, as a citizen of a fellow European Union country, that I am welcome and able to live and work here on equal terms.  How will that change after 23 June 2016?

I am not alone as a UK citizen living and working in another EU country.  In Spain alone there are over 1 million UK citizens doing something similar, many of whom have retired there.  For many people this ability to live and work in another country may not be of interest and not something that you ever see yourself doing.  But there are other working life benefits that have come from being part of the EU, some of which may feel more relevant to you.

So what am I referring to?  Let me give you a few examples………….

  • Paid paternity leave, and now shared parental leave (which is paid, rather than unpaid). Both partners / parents can now have time off to spend with their new born or adopted child, not just the mother.
  • The right not to be discriminated against because you are a parent (expectant mother, a maternity leave returner, a working parent etc).
  • Guaranteed paid holiday of at least 30 days per year (including bank holidays). Depending on your age, you may remember the days when there was no such thing or certainly a lot less paid holiday.
  • The right to be part of a trade union, should you want to be.
  • Your employer has to provide you with a safe working environment, with the personal protective equipment (PPE) to keep you safe and allow you regular rest breaks.

There are lots more examples I could cite that we take for granted, and that any good employer would do anyway to keep their employees motivated, healthy and safe, without “Europe telling them to”.

Don’t necessarily believe that all employment legislation that comes out of Europe is “bureaucratic” or Europe “interfering”.  A lot of what current UK workers, not just employees, take for granted happened thanks to Europe.

Perhaps this is something to ponder as the holiday season approaches, when you may be enjoying some paid time off in the Mediterranean sun somewhere (without the need to get an entry visa) …..

Eu exit and the implications for your business

Following the unexpected confirmation of a “leave” vote, many businesses will already be turning their attention to what happens next?

The most important message is that the referendum result does not trigger any automatic legal changes; neither does the UK’s formal notification that it will be withdrawing from the EU.

The UK will continue to be a member of the EU for the time being, and the status and effect of all UK and EU law remains unchanged for now, and possibly for some time in the future.

Beyond that, however, much remains to be debated and negotiated – such as the shape of trading agreements between the UK and the EU, the status of EU-derived law, thorny issues such as acquired rights, and the UK’s relationships with non-EU states.

It’s still business as usual for a while – no immediate changes

Neither the referendum result nor the UK’s formal notification to the EU has any immediate legal effect. From a legal perspective, it will be ‘business as usual’, probably for some time to come.

  • The next step is for the UK to give formal notification to the EU of it’s intention to leave. This will start the withdrawal process, which must be concluded within two years unless an extension can be agreed (which requires the consent of all twenty-seven remaining Member States).
  • The future trading relationship between the UK and the EU could take one of a number of different forms; which form it takes will have significant implications in terms of the movement of goods, services, people and capital.
  • The UK will also need to undergo a major legislative project to identify which areas of EU-derived law will stay, which will be modified and which will no longer have effect in the UK.

Each of these processes is likely to involve much consultation with the UK public and industry. Businesses have an important part to play in shaping the environment that they will be trading in, domestically and cross-border.

Employment implications of Brexit for your business

UK employers are unlikely to see any large-scale changes to current employment law in the short-term as a result of the UK leaving the EU.  The UK’s on-going relationship with EU Member States, as well as our own workplace culture, is likely to demand that the UK retains many of the EU-derived laws that have already been incorporated into domestic legislation.

Free movement of workers within the EU

Now we’ve voted to leave the EU, the free movement of workers will certainly be affected. However, changes to legislation are likely to be gradual rather than immediate.

While in theory citizens of EU member states no longer enjoy the automatic right to work in the UK (and vice versa), this will form part of negotiations to establish the UK’s new trading relationship with the EU.

EU nationals already employed in the UK may already have acquired rights under UK legislation, depending on how long they’ve been here. It’s likely that many will be permitted to stay in return for a similar agreement for UK nationals currently employed in EU member states.

For prospective employees, however, it may be a different story. While it will still be possible to employ personnel from EU member states, there may be extra administrative costs to be factored in, such as visa applications. An EU employee’s capacity to remain long-term in the UK may also be affected.

There may also be limitations on the type of workers that will be allowed to seek employment in the UK. If we choose to follow a model more like the US or Australia, visas may only be granted for those in professions identified as having a particular need.

Other employment legislation changes

We also expect some piecemeal reform to specific areas of employment law, such as:

  • Clarification of the rules for calculating holiday pay and how holiday accrues during periods of long term sick leave, under the Working Time Regulations (WTR)1998.
  • There is on-going litigation regarding inconsistencies between the WTR and the EU Working Time Directive (which the WTR implements in the UK), creating wide-spread confusion for UK businesses and potentially significant accrued and on-going liabilities.
  • Whilst the UK government is unlikely to repeal current working time rules, it may well take the opportunity to clarify the rules around holiday pay and provide much needed guidance for employers.
  • Pro-business reform of agency worker rights, given the additional costs and complexities of engaging agency workers since the introduction of the Agency Workers Regulations 2010, which implement the Temporary Agency Work Directive.

Whilst the AWR gives agency workers limited equal treatment rights with comparable permanent employees from day one, following a 12-week period, an agency worker has a right to equal pay, working time and holiday with a comparable permanent employee. The extent of any reforms in this area will depend on the exit terms the government is able to negotiate.


Understand the profile of your workforce. How many are EU citizens? How long have they lived in the UK? Do any have the right to a British passport that you can support?

If you are in a sector recruiting lots of EU nationals or likely to, consider accelerating any planned recruitment before changes are announced to the process. Much more likely that any existing arrangements will be allowed rather than unpicked.

If you are planning to expand into areas of Europe, familiarise yourself with local employment legislation and understand any opportunities to second staff from UK and vice versa.

If you would like to speak to an experienced employment advisor, please contact us.



Part 2 of our predictions for HR in 2016

In the second part of the ‘Key predictions for HR for HR in 2016 we continue with Bersin of Deloitte predictions for global HR in 2016, additional commentary by Amelore.

the chariotWe have already covered Digital HR; the rush to replace outdated HR systems; the Global rush to replace and re-engineer performance management; engagement, retention and culture as top priorities and the continuing mobility of career and talent and the investment in coaching and mentoring. Moving on we have…

  1. New models for learning

It’s all about the Four “E’s”

Education (formal training)

Experiences (developmental assingments and projects)

Environment (a culture and work environment that facilitate learning)

Exposure (connections and relationships with great people).

70/20/10 model – 70% through on the job experience and practice, 20% through other people by exposure to coaching, feedback and networking and 10% through formal education-based learning interventions.

  • Traditional LMS replaced by highly interactive, curated and recommendation approach to learning.
  • L&D professionals focussing on becoming ‘learning experience designers’ as opposed to ‘instructional designers’.
  • Employees leave organisations that do not develop them or provide appealing learning experiences.

Organisations are increasingly paring down their L&D team and using external expertise if they want to run face to face sessions.  Coaching is used more as is e-learning. Many organisations have developed a strong e-learning suite but enhance this with external providers.

  1. Diversity and Inclusion – merge with key business strategies to move well beyond compliance and become a strategic part of business.

This has been part of HR for 30yrs. But little impact. Now on Global CEO’s agenda due to global workforce. Lots of press about issue – unconscious bias etc

Deloitte studied talent practices of 1,400-plus companies with a focus on Asia. After nearly 2 years of research finding point conclusively that the highest performing companies with a far superior cash flow embed inclusion into talent practices everywhere.

In the UK last year, 2015, 75% of graduates were female.  Over a third of British households are now led by a woman earning more than her male partner or as the sole earner. House husbands are on the rise although support for men getting back into the workplace.  In the same way workplaces are geared towards supporting women working in part-time roles as secondary breadwinners but missing that many women are fulltime. Not always from choice (career women) but necessity. Just people with careers.

Organisations still have lots to do to truly embrace equality in the workplace. All male boards are all male boards.  They can’t hope to represent the workforce in the way a more balanced team would.  Likewise Unconscious Bias is alive and rampant in many recruitment practices. In many workplaces. PWC actually have a policy that women who work as receptionists have to wear 2-4inch heels. In 2016!

  1. People Analytics accelerate its growth

Companies are hiring head of people analytics, building teams and replacing HR platforms with a singular goal of creating a meaningful and useful database of information about their people.

New function is critically important. Just as Marketing can analyse the result of campaigns, create personas and segments of customer population and understand the drivers of market share success so companies are starting to be able to do for employees.

Emergence of behavioural economics leading to the application of ‘choice architecture.  Allowing employees to choose next steps – ie choice of 2/3 new jobs.  Turning traditional practices on their head.

HR teams are now becoming very data driven and the world of analytics is sweeping forward.

Many HR teams are led by people that don’t have these skills and consequently don’t set this as an area of focus.  Organisations are too used to poor quality data coming from the HR team that there is a failure to invest. In better technology. In staff with the skills to produce meaningful reports. So many businesses still have appraisal systems requiring manual interpretation by the HR team. This reflects an approach and a period of time long gone by.

  1. New breed of HR leaders enter the stage

HR profession is going through a true reinvention. Younger leaders starting to take over, heavy investment in technology, organisations sharing their creative solutions openly and critically the alignment of HR with the business is improving dramatically. Innovation is key and the function of HR is becoming increasingly important to companies.

Yet many still have Administrators or Policemen in charge with old fashioned or paper driven systems, under trained teams, organisation structures that appear bloated and misaligned and many have not figured out how to do analytics yet.

It is obvious that companies with talented HR leaders will be more competitive. Sharper. More focussed.

How can companies with the wrong HR support ever truly compete on the global stage?

We find many companies are unaware of how HR is changing and either have no-one supporting them or have the wrong level of support.

Conducting a review of your HR needs is a sensible action for any CEO.  Outsourcing HR needs, enhancing internal support, in-housing (hiring internally when you have had HR outsourcing support) and HR enhancement (additional services to compliment existing HR support) are all possibilities for fast growing and ambitious businesses.

Summarised from Predictions for 2016 – A bold new world of Talent, Learning, Leadership and HR Technology ahead. Bersin by Deloitte with commentary by Amelore.


Job evaluation scheme and gender pay audits

With the new requirements for organisations with 250+ staff to conduct a gender pay audit and publish results from 2018, many organisations are reviewing or implementing their job evaluation schemes.

Employers operate job evaluation schemes for a range of reasons, including the development of clear and orderly pay and grading structures and to help counter equal pay claims, as well to assist with market pricing where required.

A single job evaluation may be implemented to cover the whole workforce or employers may operate different schemes for varying groups of employees. The former approach is often favoured as this is likely to help counter any potential equal pay issues.

Types of job evaluation

There are two main types of job evaluation: analytical schemes, where jobs are broken down into their core components, and non-analytical schemes, where jobs are viewed as a whole. The use of analytical schemes is more popular because of the capacity to help provide a defence against equal pay claims.

Analytical schemes

These offer greater objectivity in assessment as the jobs are broken down in detail.

Examples of analytical schemes include ‘points rating’ and ‘factor comparison’ approaches.

Points rating – the key elements of each job, which are known as ‘factors’, are identified by the organisation and then broken down into components which may also be weighted. Each factor is assessed separately and points allocated according to the level needed for the job. The more demanding the job, the higher the points value.

Examples of factors commonly assessed include:

  • knowledge and skills
  • people management responsibility
  • communication and networking
  • decision-making
  • working environment
  • impact and influence
  • financial responsibility.

Factor comparison is also based on an assessment of factors, though no points are allocated. Use of this method is less widespread than ‘points rating’ systems as the latter approach enables a large number of jobs to be ranked at the time.

Non-analytical schemes

These are less objective than analytical schemes, but are often simpler and cheaper to introduce. Methods include job ranking, paired comparisons and job classification.

Job ranking -puts jobs in an organisation in order of their importance, or the level of difficulty involved in performing them or their value to the organisation.

Paired comparisons – compares each job in turn with another in an organisation. This takes longer than job ranking as each job is considered separately.

Job classification, also known as job grading. Before classification, an agreed number of grades are determined, usually between four and eight, based on tasks performed, skills, competencies, experience, initiative and responsibility. Clear distinctions are made between grades. The jobs in the organisation are then allocated to the pre-determined grades.

Developing job evaluation schemes

Whether adopting an analytical or a non-analytical approach, organisations have three main options over scheme design and development:

  • a scheme may be developed in-house
  • a consultancy’s off-the-shelf package may be purchased
  • a consultancy may tailor its package to suit the organisation’s needs.

The system selected will depend on the size of the organisation and the aim of the job evaluation exercise. The Hay Group’s Guide Chart-Profile Method is the most widely used scheme.

Other factors to consider

Job evaluation is a complex and time-consuming task and many organisations draw on the expertise of external organisations to help. The key issues to consider include:

  • The process is often as important as the results.
  • Job evaluation is an ongoing process.
  • An appeals procedure should be established before the evaluation begins.
  • Clear, detailed and up-to-date job descriptions have to be drawn up.
  • The more complex the scheme, the more detailed the job description needed.
  • Accurate records of decisions have to be kept.
  • The results have to be checked to see if there are any pay anomalies.
  • Effective communications are essential, as employees may have concerns over their future job grading and pay.

Operational considerations

Many organisations don’t have the skills in-house to conduct a Gender Pay audit or review or implement job evaluation schemes. The latter can be a big piece of work and organisations should not under estimate the time and cost implications.  Given we are half way through 2016 and first set of published results will be April 2018 time is tight to really get your house in order though still possible. 

Any company Job evaluation (and market pricing exercises) schemes need to be reviewed regularly to ensure such approaches continue to meet changing business needs. Job evaluation is an assessment of the role, not the person doing it, and should be based on a fair, transparent system that is effectively communicated and understood by employees.

The type of scheme chosen will depend on organisational needs, but any staff making decisions on job roles must remain impartial and may require training in the chosen system.

How can we assist you?

Amelore can provide both job evaluation and gender pay auditing services tailored to your needs.  If you would like more information, please get in touch with us.