5 things every manager (of people) should know

Being a manager can be both a tough and a highly rewarding job. Often the result of a promotion coming after hard work. Or a brand new role in a new organisation.  But rarely does the status of manager come with a tight brief and any training. Most managers learn the hard way about what is expected of them and for many their main source of development is how they have been managed; well or badly.

If every manager understood the following 5 things clearly their chances of being successful and effective would significantly improve which in turn would have a powerful knock on effect across the company.

What their purpose is

When we audit companies we often ask the CEO and other senior people, what the purpose of different roles are. We also ask the individual doing that role. Often the definitions don’t match. Sometimes it sounds like two different jobs to us. If you do nothing else, make sure you can articulate the purpose of the manager’s role.

Often explanations talk about production, technical expertise, sales targets, quality but rarely do they talk about responsibilities for the people being managed. It can be seen as Business as Usual – ie in addition to other expectations on the manager meaning it will be a low priority. Which will impact on the whole culture of the organisation and not in a positive way.

What they can and can’t do

This might seem obvious but it rarely is.  We are talking about whether they can hire and fire, what their budget is, whether they can arrange training and promote people. Are they free to discipline their staff or must this be culturally approved? What isn’t written on the job description or needs to be explained?

What vicarious liability is and how it might impact on them

Vicarious liability refers to a situation where someone is held responsible for the actions or omissions of another person. In a workplace context, an employer can be liable for the acts or omissions of its employees, provided it can be shown that they took place in the course of their employment.

Many employers are unaware that they can be liable for a range of actions committed by their employees in the course of their employment – these can include bullying and harassment, violent or discriminatory acts or even libel and breach of copyright. It’s also possible to take action against an employer for the behaviour of third parties, such as clients and customers, provided these parties are deemed to be under the control of the employer.

The key question of any case of vicarious liability is whether the employee was acting in a personal capacity, or in the course of their employment. This can often be difficult to determine. Nor does an employer’s liability end once the employee leaves the organisation – as the law stands, action can still be taken against an employer even though the person in question no longer works for them.

What their H&S responsibilities are

Under the law employers are responsible for health and safety management. For every employee this responsibility lies with their manager. Even if there is a H&S Advisor. It is the managers that have the responsibility on a day to day basis because it is the employer’s duty to protect the health, safety and welfare of their employees and other people who might be affected by their business.

This means making sure that workers and others are protected from anything that may cause harm, effectively controlling any risks to injury or health that could arise in the workplace which includes managing and monitoring stress. Also managing sickness absence and understanding when an employee may need to be offered reasonable adjustments if they have a special need or a disability, and it might help them remain at work.

Employers also have duties under health and safety law to assess risks in the workplace. Risk assessments should be carried out that address all risks that might cause harm in your workplace.

What the unwritten rules are

Often the unwritten rules or internal ways of working are the biggest keys to success or failure. Knowing them is a start. Often politics is a key part of this. Who to know, be connected with. Who to avoid upsetting. How the organisation deals with conflict and disagreements. How the culture dictates the ways of working for the organisation.

We get involved in situations where managers haven’t worked out and often failing to understand and comply with unwritten rules (obvious to everyone apart from the manager) is sited. Imagine being told it was all over for failing to comply with rules that no-one told them about.

Often a solution to tackling any of these issues that you recognise can be signing up to an HR audit and a bespoke management training programme. So that you know your managers are being supported but also that what they are being taught and guided on is appropriate and on brand for your company.  This can be in conjunction with senior leaders and any internal HR function.

The good news is Amelore offer this service so do get in touch if we can help and advise you further.

What every manager wants to avoid

In our work, we audit any new company we work with and have observed that a common theme in many is that managers don’t appear to want to manage.

By that we mean managing people. Setting standards on performance and monitoring them, holding employees to account, identifying what behaviours are needed to create the right culture to grow the business and being confrontational if and when it is necessary. Or they are only embracing the nicer side of management. Giving out pay rises and promotions etc

Managers and leaders seldom avoid this type of work for any other reason than they don’t know how to do it and are worried about getting it wrong. Often employees pick up on a fear and become experts on how to make the most of this which is rarely beneficial for the manager or the company. Equally managers aren’t set any targets or held to account about whether they do it (well) or not. So they will naturally focus on what is valued.

As we are all aware, being good at a technical or specialist role can often lead to promotion into a completely different type of role. Leading and managing a team is so much more than being the most senior member of it with the biggest say. The person that earns the most does so because they also have significant people management responsibilities and are accountable for their team as well as business area. Rarely is this properly explained. During recruitment or promotion discussions. Usually the elephant in the room and therefore often misunderstood.

No training or guidance for managers

Here are some of the things that managers have often had no training or guidance on whatsoever:

  • A core understanding of management theory and what is relevant to their company and industry
  • How to delegate and communicate effectively
  • An understanding of their obligations and duty of care under employment and health and safety legislation
  • How to turn key organisational KPI’s into objectives or targets for staff
  • The difference between technical and behavioural competence
  • How to understand and harness the power of personality
  • How to select staff – interview competentantly, understand and recognise unconscious bias and discrimination. Understand the equality act.
  • Motivational techniques and team building

It stands to reason that if you don’t know how to do something you may avoid it or try and get someone else to do it. Particularly if you fear negative consequences for yourself. Or if you observe that no-one else is tackling similar issues.

Revolving door culture

But as many will be aware, not doing something often has a bigger impact on your culture than doing something, even if it’s not perfect. Not tackling people management issues will build up over time until you start to observe that your good people are leaving. You will replace them of course. At considerable time and expense. And then your fanastic new hire might leave before their probabtion period is up and you start to wonder if it’s something in the business.

The truth is that it’s your culture. How you do things. What you avoid or ignore.

Targetted development

But you can address the fear and reluctance of maangers with some targeted management development training. A core part of that should be an assessment of whether you have the right poepe in lead roles.  Often you will have and they just need devellping. But some people don’t make or want to manage people. No matter how much you spend on core Leadership programmes. However they may be suited to a different specialist role? Or have a No 2 that is interested?

What provider to pick?

There are plenty of companies around who specialise in leadership and management development training. Many long established and many newer ones coming through.

Talking to CEO’s about their previous experiences of such engagement they often report that many staff enjoy attending such initiaitves but they rarely had a long lasting effect as they often didn’t address the following issues:

  • Who held managerial posts
  • What their remit was v what they did
  • Whether the corporate structure was correct
  • What the culture was (desirable v actual)
  • How they would be managed post the intervention

It was hard therefore to quantify any return on the investment made often because the desired outcome hadn’t been pinned down or properly understood.

Our approach

At Amelore, supporting organisations to develop managers has become a growing area for us.  We usually work with companies that are already established and performing well but who want to develop their management team and culture to create space for a senior team to focus on the strategy. Often they don’t have an HR Director in their business.

Our work as external HR professionals can involve us recruiting new managers and coaching key individuals along side regular internal workshops. We can honestly say that every company has different needs and consequently different programmes.

What we bring is our insight into how to make companies work better which we’ve gained over many years. And our HR expertise.  And just like Mary Poppins, we stay as long as we are needed. Ultimately our aim is to leave that company in a good place to grow, compete and innovate. To give it competitive advantage because it works as well on the inside as the outside.